Remember Wiesmann? It’s Back In EV Form

Remember Wiesmann? It's Back In EV Form


German firm Wiesmann GmbH first popped up on our collective radar in 2005 when it announced the production of a BMW-powered roadster with interesting styling and an impressive power-to-weight. Unfortunately that company folded in 2013 after plans to expand outside of Europe never materialized. An investor purchased what was left of the company and announced in 2020 that the company would be re-firing the kilns to start whipping up a few more of these.

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Image: Weismann

Last month Wiesmann teased its new Project Thunderball, but failed to provide any details. This week those details came to light, and it’s far more interesting than anyone could have imagined. Gone is the BMW powerplant, and in its place is a bunch of battery and electric motor. Thunderball is still styled like every other Wiesmann you’ve ever not seen, despite the lack of need for a long hood to house a front-engine. The retro styling is great and all, but what’s the spec?

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Image: Weismann

Wiesmann says this car is aiming for a 3700 pound ready-to-drive weight, which is pretty impressive, all things considered. A carbon fiber body and a right-sized 83 kWh battery pack, and RWD architecture means the car doesn’t weigh as much as an Escalade, and should help with the car’s dynamic performance. Even with a normal sized battery, Thunderball is claimed to deliver 311 miles of range, and the rear-mounted pair of motors provides 671 horseponies and 811 foot lubs of torque. That’s good enough for a 2.9-second 0-60 time, and with one motor powering each wheel, likely has a pretty trick traction and torque vectoring systems.

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Image: Weismann

The company says it has attempted to inject “drivers’ car DNA” into its electric machine. “A change in setting gives a purposeful moment of enjoyment to the driver,” says Wiesmann. “Something lacking in most EVs on the market today.” Apparently paddles on the steering column work like shifters, adjusting the car’s regen braking to simulate engine braking. This isn’t brand new tech, but it’s interesting to see it applied to a boutique electric sports car.

Image for article titled Remember Wiesmann? It's Back In EV Form

Image: Weismann

So how much for all of this future tech in an old-school wrapper? Apparently it’ll start at 300,000 euros (about $316,000 at current exchange rates). If you really want one, you can order one right now. There’s no word yet as to whether this one will come to the U.S. market, though. Here’s hoping.



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